Silicon Wafer for Microfluidics Chip Research

University Wafer Silicon Wafers and Semicondcutor Substrates Services
University Silicon Wafer for Production

Silicon Wafer for Microfluidic Chips

We can help you with your microfluidic chips. Any questions regarding photolithography, sputtering, deep reactive ion etching on silicon wafers. We can also help with metal depostion.

Some of our wafers have a Total Thickness Variation (TTV) 1 micron to help with your Micromechanical (MEMS) research.

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Microfluidic Chips have channels etched into the silicon wafers on the micrometer scale. The channel is used to control
the flow of fluids using MEMS pumps.

Silicon Wafers Microfluidics

Integrated Circuits (IC), also known as semiconductor chips, are packed so tightly with billions of electronic components that they could be faked as a single piece of silicon, but while they fool themselves, they are actually packed with hundreds of thousands of components. These resistors and capacitors work together to perform logic operations and store data. The design of an integrated circuit requires a series of manufacturing steps that introduce precise amounts of chemicals into selected areas of a silicon wafer to form microscopic devices and compounds. The manufacturing process involves the production of electronic circuits on wafers made of a wide range of materials, including copper, aluminum, silicon and other metals. [Sources: 10]

Silicon discs are produced with an oxide layer and a photoresist polymer, which removes nitride and bonds the silicon to the control layer of the substrate. The next day, a chemical agent is used to remove all oxide layers that do not protect the photorefers, followed by the removal of chemical agents from the desired area of the silicon wafer, then the fluid layer (silicon bonded to Pyrex) is cut and peeled off and removed from its substrate. After the oxide has been removed and spun, fine structures are etched into the surface of a silicone wafer with a fine structure. [Sources: 5, 6, 14, 16]

The control layer is produced by casting a mould of silicon wafer, fluid layer and electrode (microfluidic channel) onto the silicon wafer. Figure 6c shows a self-venting self-spinning structure with black silicon patterns and a surface of the wafers passivated with Al-2-O-3, while the electrodes and microfluidic channels are patterned as explained above. The flow layers are produced after casting the dimethylsiloxane polymer (vulcanized at room temperature) and GE polymers, with the control layers and the flow layer consisting of an Etsu poly (1,2,3-dioxane) polymer and silicon. [Sources: 0, 9]

The starting material is the dimethylsiloxane poly (1,2,3-dioxane) polymer, which has a resistance of 5 - 20 ohms and a resistance of 0.5 - 10 ohms. We have a good understanding of what to look for in order to create microfluidic channels on silicon wafers, including good channel definition and biocompatibility. [Sources: 10, 15]

When using a silicon wafer, several steps must be carried out to ensure that the manufacture of the channel back and the access holes do not interfere with each other. When the TSV is punched into the silicon wafers, it is connected to an overpressure vacuum to stop the etching process. The insulation is designed to ensure multiplexity by enabling the selected e-gate. [Sources: 3, 7, 9]

While some well-developed technologies come directly from semiconductor manufacturing, most of these processes are made in silicon. Microfluidic glass networks are made using silicon wafers and other materials such as glass, as described in Section 11. However, there is now a toolbox to produce microfibers with a wide range of applications, not only for glass but also for silicon wafers. This starts with the development of a high-performance, cost-effective and easy-to-use glass wafer for the production of microfluidics. [Sources: 10, 11]

The Mohanty laboratory at UTA is now using this system to study neurons that grow on silicon wafers. The researchers used the system to measure changes in the level of red blood cells. The second objective is to investigate the effects of microfluidics when deposited on silicon oxide or silicon substrate. This is used in most electronics laboratories to manufacture semiconductors, such as the semiconductor chips in smartphones and other electronic devices. [Sources: 12, 13]

Figures 2 and 3 schematically show the effects of microfluidics on silicon wafers when applied and the effect of silicon oxide on the surface of the wafer. Figure 3 shows the influence of a spilled layer of nanoscale microfluidic material on a silicon substrate on blood cells. [Sources: 7, 10]

PCR chips from Imec and Panasonic are based on a microfluidic silicon platform for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). They use LOC, which consists of LOC for detection of single nucleotide polymorphism or SNP, and a layer of silicon. [Sources: 16]

Poly - N - Isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAAm) Embedded in a thermally responsive polymer with reversible phase transitions (39 m of experiments with PDMS Sylgard 184 and attempts to use it on Si wafers). The MRSI-S HVM nozzle bonder is capable of holding the nozzles III and V of a wafer, placing and connecting them to a 12-inch silicon wading device, including fine lateral movements. [Sources: 1, 2]

Next, a suitable photosensitive polymer photocoating is spun onto the silicon wafer and ultraviolet light is exposed to the wafers through a superimposed mask. [Sources: 8]

The eutectic bonding process is carried out by coating the silicon and glass wafers with patterned gold and aluminum layers. Two different types of wafers can be used, and the patterned adhesive bonding processes also allow the connection between two different types of silicon, such as silicon glass and gold glass. This is achieved by applying a gold or aluminum layer to the gold layer and then a pattern to the glass layer. [Sources: 4, 7, 9]

 

 

Sources:

[0]: https://www.pnas.org/content/104/35/13891

[1]: http://al-belmonte.pt/lmote/pdms-chemical.html

[2]: https://www.i-micronews.com/mrsi-launches-submicron-die-bonding-solution-for-silicon-photonics-co-packaging-and-wafer-level-packaging/

[3]: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-48515-4

[4]: http://www.cmmmagazine.com/cmm-articles/wafer-level-hybrid-bonding-is-a-crucial-technology-for-mems-/

[5]: https://www.news-medical.net/life-sciences/Photolithography-Microfabrication-Technique.aspx

[6]: https://www.hindawi.com/journals/apt/2020/2460212/

[7]: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10404-017-1961-0

[8]: https://web.stanford.edu/group/foundry/Microfluidic%20valve%20technology.html

[9]: https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/6/16/eaay8305

[10]: http://thailotto-online.com/epqpb2/masking-in-ic-fabrication.html

[11]: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lab-on-a-chip

[12]: https://www.kurzweilai.net/seeing-cells-through-silicon-microfluidic-devices

[13]: https://www.beilstein-journals.org/bjnano/articles/11/121

[14]: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fbioe.2018.00148/full

[15]: https://phys.org/news/2013-11-microfluidic-material-breakthrough-wafer-scale-mass.html

[16]: https://www.meddeviceonline.com/doc/silicon-a-material-with-huge-potential-for-lab-on-chips-0001